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on Jan 22, 2008 in Random Thoughts, Yellowstone Life

The Before & After

I have received LOTS of emails (& print orders, thx) from the images I blogged last week from Yellowstone. It was an incredible experience from the grandeur that is Yellowstone to the great folks who were DLWS. Those folks, you know we had them going at 06:30 and were with them until midnight everyday (there was no time off) and all they did was smile and make some incredible images! One helluva a week!

A common question about the images tends to be “Were the images worked in Photoshop?” Darn good question and the answer for all the landscape photos is, darn tootin! None of the wildlife see Photoshop, but my landscape images sure do. To be specific, they see Capture NX. I find that especially true with the D3, NX does it all for me. Here’s an example.

 

dlcwyys4944.jpg

 

yellowstone-thermal-4944.jpg

The top photo is right out of the D3. The biggest problems are two fold. First is the horrible color cast caused by the steam coming from Castle Geyser next door. Second is the lack of light in the pool itself. Now McNally & I thought about throwing an SB-800 into that sucker to light it up for the one shot, but there’s a big sign saying “No Flash Fill Permitted in the Pools” so we went to plan B. Knowing these two facts that I would have a color cast and no light getting down into the pool, I composed accordingly knowing the tools I have back in the computer. After finishing the image (which is totally different from fixing), it looks like this…

See a difference? The finishing took only seconds with NX doing the lion share of removing the color cast and than pulling the color out of the pool. In Photoshop, all I did was to use Tonal Contrast in Nix’s Color Efex 3.0 for the finishing touch. This isn’t some Moose voodoo, all of you can obtain the same results. If you don’t know how, come journey with us on DLWS, we’re more than happy to help you find your vision!

Photo captured by D3, 14-24AFS on Lexar UDMA digital film