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on Apr 27, 2017 in WRP Ed Zone

And the Numbers Reveal?

In the current issue of PDN (you did get it, don’t you?), Publisher Lauren Wendle has a great piece. It starts off by mentioning the closing of the doors of industry institutions Popular Photography and American Photo. These giants of our industry going away was quite the emotional blow and to some, the harbinger of bad days to come. Then she goes on to site some darn important facts that all of us need to grasp. She starts by quoting Farhad Manjoo of The New York times who writes, “Snap (makers of the app Snapchat) is betting on a “long-term trend: the rise and eventual global dominance of the visual culture.” I quote her, “Images are now not only to document the world but to communicate. That communication has no language barriers: Photography is truly becoming the international language we use to “talk” to each other–Manjoo’s article asserts the now we “speak in pictures.” It’s estimated that 1.2 trillion pictures will be taken in 2017, a 9 percent increase...

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on Apr 27, 2017 in WRP Ed Zone

Making Big with Small

When the rare moment presents itself where I can use a big subject small in a frame to show the sheer size of something big, I love it. The classic example is a landscape where the land is small and the clouds tower over it. In the skies, it’s harder to do because clouds mean rough air and avoiding them is the smart thing to do. At the same time, I’m often not in the skies with a big plane like the B-25 bomber, but rather a small plane which doesn’t work as well for scale. But when I had the opportunity to step back and shoot them small in the frame telling the story of the large building cumulous clouds, I was a happy camper. I realize most want the fill the frame with the subject but I’m weird, I like to make it small to show the home where it lives. In this case, in the...

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on Apr 20, 2017 in WRP Ed Zone

Stallion 51 Precon

We spent a marvelous afternoon being hosted by Stallion 51 for the Photoshop World Precon. Our subject was light and we explored it with aircraft and models, seeing how we could use it to tell stories. We went out shooting at highnoon, what many think as the worst time to shoot to learn how we can make it the best time. We were fortunate that the temps were cool (for Florida) and we had some puffies in the sky all lending to fun and success. Following my basic photographic concept of KISS, we used the depth of the hangar and its large doors as our light source. The students were able to see how by moving Marisa further and closer to the opening of the hangar, we could change the light and therefore her appearance. At the same time by placing her either closer or further from the back of the hangar, we could effect the exposure of the background. So while shooting at highnoon, we could take advantage...

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on Apr 11, 2017 in WRP Ed Zone

What’s That Background?

It’s something I’ve done since, forever. After sharing this simple thing with my group last week, I realized I’ve probably never mentioned it but it’s real simple. In my own quest to visually find the best background, I take a picture of it. When I see a background in my viewfinder that intrigues me for any reason, good or bad, I simply manually focus on the background and take a photograph of it. The reason? Well like in this case with the Gtr Prairie Chicken, the birds are constantly moving on the lek. In previsualizing where a chicken was heading and if I wanted to follow it, I would look at the background where it was going. From what I previsualized, I would swing the D500 / 800mm or not. I have hundreds of these subject out of focus, background sharp in focus photos in my files. When I go back again to a location like the chickens, I look at my images taken at that location/subject previously and...

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on Mar 29, 2017 in WRP Ed Zone

Go Low Fast!

Background control, that’s a biggie in wildlife photography. When the subject is on the ground like this Burrowing Owl, background control means getting down low. But there are times when you want to be at eyelevel shooting and times when you want to drop down. When working with critters, physically moving up and down with a shy subject can be enough to make them go away. Many photographers use their knobs on the legs to raise and lower their tripod, standing up and stooping over to make all the adjustments, madly turning the knobs to unlock and lock them again. At the same time while doing this, the photographer is also breaking the golden rule when working with wildlife, taking their eyes off the subject. There is a fast and easy way to go low while watchin the subject the whole time! Many tripods like the Gitzo 5562SGT I use for the 800mm, you can pull out the tripod leg lock very quickly and with no visible motion as...

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on Mar 22, 2017 in Moose Adventures

Yellowstone Fall & Spring Workshops

Yep, Jake and I are teaming up for two Yellowstone Adventures, 25-30 October 2017 and 18-23 May 2018. We going these dates specifically for wildlife, Elk in rut, Elk & Bison with calves, migrating and nesting birds but you’re in Yellowstone, so geysers and sweeping landscapes are all part of the Adventure as well! You can pretty much figure we’ll be explore the entire park, the features, fall color, spring greens and all the critters we can. We can’t wait! You’ll fly into Bozeman, MT where we’ll pick you up and head down towards West Yellowstone where we’ll be based most of the time. Because of the nature of shooting in Yellowstone, we’ll be working out of two vehicles so everyone has their own window to shoot out of. We will be taking just FOUR photographers per Adventure (2 spots left). The price is $2180 which covers instruction, transportation to and from airport and entire week and a whole lot of fun! Call Sharon 661.204.1506 if you’re up for...

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